Category - theology

  • 25 May 2011

    Making peace, as an integral part of the life and witness of the Christian churches, has not been as common as it ought to be, the IEPC has heard.

  • 24 May 2011

    Security does not land in a helicopter; it grows from the ground up - that's what Iraqis told a professor of peace-building at Eastern Mennonite University in the USA. Different experiences and perceptions of what it is to be secure or seek security were among the insights shared by contributors to a forum at the International Ecumenical Peace Convocation in Kingston, Jamaica, in May 2011.

  • 23 Apr 2011

    Next to efforts to explain Christian trinitarian language for God, it is sermonising on the message of the cross and the meaning of the resurrection that I often find most painful at this time of year.

  • 21 Apr 2011

    Participants at a recent consultation on theological education have called for comprehensive Christian leadership development of both lay and ordained.

  • 6 Apr 2011

    Sometimes, as Pascale Palmer says in her moving blog article (http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/node/14510), being caught in large chunks of the 24/7 media maelstrom for your professional life can be an enerv

  • 2 Apr 2011

    Is the churches’ current theological reflection on stewardship and climate change ready for the rapid shifting of winds, weather, and life on earth as we know it, asks Marcelo Schneider. How can a renewed eco-theology reshape our attitudes, beliefs and actions to reflect the Christian priority of planetary justice?

  • 17 Mar 2011
  • 17 Mar 2011

    Academics at the University of Stirling, and the beliefs and values think-tank Ekklesia, have teamed up to promote a new research agenda and blog entitled Critical Religion, which aims to put hot topics under a careful spotlight.

  • 17 Mar 2011

    With the 'Critical Religion' agenda and blog, says Michael Marten, the intention is to question the category of 'religion' - but then, rather than just holding it to suspicion, or blame, or discredit, or incredulity – a growing tendency among certain public intellectuals, even if against the tide of global demographics – to examine the issues involved from a positive critical standpoint.

  • 17 Mar 2011

    In different ways, Religious Studies and theology, says Professor Richard H. Roberts, have the capacity to make intelligently accessible ways of doing things that are as ancient and as important to humankind as the making of music.