Features

  • 6 Nov 2013

    On 9 July 2011, South Sudan became the world’s newest nation. Today it is estimated to be home to more than 11 million people and is geographically one of the larger countries in Africa. The Sudanese churches have been part of the struggle and aspiration for peace and security, reports J. Ayana McCalman. But in a land rich in natural resources, there is also a need to address the humanitarian situation and significant human needs.

  • 5 Nov 2013

    The experiences and voices of a centre run by the Presbyterian Church in South Korea provide important lessons concerning the multiple insecurities felt by 'migrant wives', as the women are called, in a fast moving society. Naveen Qayyum, from Pakistan, reflects on the issues raised about migration and the experience of women at the World Council of Churches 10th Assembly meeting in Busan.

  • 1 Nov 2013

    The World Council of Churches 10th Assembly being held in Busan, Republic of Korea (30 October - 8 November 2013), is continuing the 60-year WCC campaign for advocacy of gender justice. The Council, in partnership with Korean women, has designed an encounter space – Umulga SHe-Space in the Madang exhibition hall at the WCC assembly. J. Ayana McCalman introduces the concept and the fresh space it opens up for conversation and action around gender justice.

  • 1 Nov 2013

    It has now been confirmed that Ecumenical News International (ENInews) will not outlive the drastic financial reductions imposed by its two main sponsors, the World Council of Churches (WCC) and the Lutheran World Federation (LWF), writes Michel Kocher, a journalist, director of Médias-pro in Lausanne, a member of the World Association of Christian Communication (WACC), and former president of ENInews.

  • 31 Oct 2013

    A renewed 'Claim of Right' for Scotland would invoke popular sovereignty and more than nationalist is also social democratic, liberal, green, feminist and much more, says commentator Gerry Hassan. It is the Scotland of boldness, determination and self-determination, which is larger than labels and beyond being small-minded about differences. It is also a challenge to the fading 'high Scotland' which talks the people's talk while remaining paternalist, and a step beyond the limitations of the current referendum campaign.

  • 26 Oct 2013

    The 10th Assembly of the World Council of Churches (WCC) begins at the end of October and promises to be one of the most diverse gatherings of Christians in the world. The assembly will be an opportunity for renewing the worldwide ecumenical movement – infusing it with honesty, humility and hope, according to the WCC General Secretary.

  • 24 Oct 2013

    There are three important lessons that we need to learn from the industrial dispute-going-on-catastrophe at the Grangemouth oil refinery, says Robin McAlpine from the Jimmy Reid Foundation. Firstly, industrial ownership in Britain is broken. Secondly, industrial relations in Britain is broken. Thirdly, London's capacity to understand or take an interest in the rest of Britain seems problematic.

  • 19 Oct 2013

    Many uncertain – and as yet unanswerable – questions prey on commentators' minds about Turkey today. Can it indeed play a constructive global (read: stabilising) role in the Middle East and North Africa region or is it merely a spoiler at best and a bully at worst? Ekklesia associate and regional expert Dr Harry Hagopian explores the issues around and behind Turkey's current situation.

  • 12 Oct 2013

    Today, with the disarmament experts in Syria trying to dismantle the stockpiles of chemical weapons, let us not forget that the actual challenge is to stop the conventional war, says Ekklesia associate and regional commentator Dr Harry Hagopian. Given the facts on the ground, now is perhaps the intelligent time to contain the horrendous deaths as well as raw anger. Why? Because the alarming alternative for this 30-month war will be a macabre spectre that continues to haunt Syria, extend to its neighbouring countries, with more refugees, further radicalisation of society and a Somalia-like failed state, he says.

  • 16 Sep 2013

    In his book The Great Tax Robbery, Richard Brooks notes that "the institutions that shape the tax system have been captured by the tax industry and corporate interests. Policy is determined through committees and consultation processes in which the tax avoidance industry’s representatives dominate, before being nodded through by parliament without proper debate. This cosy cartel urgently needs dismantling," he declares. Wendy Bradley argues that replacing recently resigned David Heaton with someone on the General Anti Abuse advisory panel (GAAR) who represents ordinary people rather than the tax wizards would be a good place to start.