Religion and Society

  • 22 Mar 2008

    Easter is not about some nasty death cult where a blood sacrifice must be paid to appease an angry God, says Giles Fraser. The crucifixion reveals human death-dealing at its worst and the resurrection offers a new start, refusing the logic of scapegoating.

  • 22 Mar 2008

    The Bible needs to be re-read from the viewpoint of women so as to shatter "institutionalised patriarchy", which is reinforced by "conservative" biblical interpretation, says a leader of a prominent group of women theologians.

  • 21 Mar 2008

    The church is running out of justifications for the various anomalies it clings onto, and it is just a matter of time before they go completely, says Jonathan Bartley. We cannot proclaim the message of God's liberating future by clinging to the past.

  • 21 Mar 2008

    Today's world "lives with death and resurrection in many ways and in many places", says the president of the Methodist Conference in Britain. The duty of the church is to be with them in this and to point to the hope of the gospel.

  • 21 Mar 2008

    The Seven Deadly Sins have been given a makeover. Yet before the makeover artists get to work maybe all Christians should pause and consider the sin business, says Glynn Cardy.

  • 21 Mar 2008

    There have been all kinds of speculations about the religious convictions and background of US presidential candidate Barack Obama. Justin Thacker looks at his Christian outlook and asks what his relation is to evangelicalism.

  • 21 Mar 2008

    Easter Monday marks the 28th anniversary of the murder of Monseñor Oscar Romero, Archbishop of San Salvador, in El Salvador - killed for defending the poor in the name of Christ.

  • 21 Mar 2008

    There is a strong link between positive psychological adjustment to a death and one’s ability to deal with of the loss through one’s faith and religious practices, says Andrew J Weaver, a United Methodist minister and professional research psychologist.

  • 20 Mar 2008
  • 20 Mar 2008

    The modern temptation is to dismiss resurrection as fantasy or reduce it to spiritualised sophistry, says Simon Barrow. The shape of the core Christian hope is both more substantial and more subtle than that.